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Life on the Deckle Edge

Poetry Friday - The Roundup is HERE!

 

Greetings, Poetry Lovers!

 

Many of you have just started a new school year, or are about to, or have watched your fledglings or grand-fledglings hop off to school or college. Such an exciting time!  (Our youngest fledgling has moved to Atlanta to start grad school/seminary this week.)

 

Seems like just yesterday he was turning the pages of BABYBUG, one of his favorite baby/toddler magazines.  In 2013, The HIGHLIGHTS FOR CHILDREN folks launched a magazine for the tiniest tykes:  HELLO – a "... chew-proof, drool-resistant magazine for babies and toddlers" that "packs up a bundle of joyful stories and poems, as well as expert advice for parents." It's a fun, educational adventure in print with thick, slick pages. (Here's a link to subscription information.) 

 

I've had a few poems accepted by HELLO and was thrilled to discover one had been published in the July issue.  I was even MORE thrilled when a Poetry Friday friend shared a picture of her grandson "reading" it! Isn't he adorable?  (Honored to share the picture, but we'll honor his privacy, too.)

 

Here's the poem:

 

    Spider, Spider

 

    by Robyn Hood Black

 

 

   Spider, spider,

   Weave and spin

   Down, around,

   And up again

 

   Spider, spider,

   Time to rest

   in your round

   And webby nest.

 

©2018 Highlights for Children

 

The poem was illustrated by Maria Neradova. (Click here for her website.)

 

[Spiderly aside… some of you might recall my obsession with Golden Silk Orb Weavers.  Two years ago at this time, I was following the daily habits of one which took up conveniently right outside my kitchen window.  I mentioned her in a couple of blog posts here and here.  The poem above came from my observations of her quick and fancy footwork building and rebuilding her web.]

 

This time of year does brim with excitement.  Just in case you've been on a month-long cruise with no cell service or WiFi, I want to make sure everyone knows about GREAT MORNING! Poems for School Leaders to Read Aloud.  This eye-opening volume features 75 poems by 50 poets and is the latest inspiring offering from Pomelo Books, the poetry-power publishing force led by Janet Wong and Sylvia Vardell.  (I'm delighted my poem, "Sincerely,"  is included, as a linked poem to Janet's "#1 and A++" which celebrates school volunteers.)

 

Lots of Poetry Friday blog posts have offered inside peeks – thanks to all who have shared.  Here's Sylvia's wonderful post over at Poetry for Children from July.  Click here for more at the Pomelo Books site.

 

So, GREAT MORNING to you… let's have a Roundup!  All are welcome, including you Thursday night early-birds/night owls. Leave your links in the comments below, and I'll round up old-school style throughout the day on Friday.  (Note – with recent changes in Blog-land privacy, I no longer have access to email addresses associated with comments.  Do remember to leave your link!) :0)

 

THE ROUNDUP:

 

Ruth at There is No Such Thing as a Godforsaken Town starts us off thoughtfully this week, in light of the darkness of the daily news. She shares an original sonnet in response, as well as one of The Bard's.

 

Kimberly Hutmacher raises a poetic toast with a sippy cup!  Read her perfectly wonderful original poem inspired by her granddaughter – and, if you can help out with Poetry Friday hosting on Oct. 19, let her know!

 

At Reflections on the Teche, the always-inspiring Margaret has a couple of wonderful student poems (shared by a fellow teacher) inspired by Margaret's new book, BAYOU SONG – Creative Explorations of the South Louisiana Landscape. Psstt… she'll be at the National Book Festival; will you?

 

At Radio, Rhythm & Rhyme, Matt has taken inspiration from Diane Mayr's cherita posts to pen a lovely back-to-school cherita of his own.  I dare you not to smile. 

 

Ever-clever librarian Linda at A Word Edgewise shares a peek into PLANET LIBRARY (a stroke of student brilliance) with a poem by Alberto Alvaro Ríos, "Don't Go into the Library."

 

Mary Lee at A Year of Reading has the perfect new-school-year poem for fellow teachers, as timely today as when she first shared it six years ago!

 

Michelle Kogan  guides us into this upcoming change of seasons with an original poem, "Running," and also "In Late August" by Peter Campion. AND, she's got info about her beautiful Etsy shop's participation in Etsy's Labor Day Sale this weekend.  (I'm in this weekend, too! :0) )  Michelle's shop-wide sale runs through Sept. 23rd.

 

Chiming in from the road this week, Jone Rush MacCulloch shares some Summer Poem Swap goodness from Linda Mitchell.  Fan of Monarch butterflies?  Carl Sandburg?  Collaged cards?  There's a lot of delight packed into a compact post!

 

Linda at TeacherDance has a special back-to-school poem she wrote for her grandkids (and everyone starting a new year), "School Starting – The Other To-Do List." I love it so much I sent it to my third-grade-teacher-daughter. (She loved it too!)

 

At The Opposite of Indifference, Tabatha offers us a personal look at history with Iris Jamahl Dunkle's haunting and lyrical "Communion of Dust." 

 

Diane has some fresh looks at death and poetry – yep – over at Random Noodling.  Enjoy her original work and you can learn a new phrase, too - "Momento Mori." 

 

Kurious Kitty reminds us what Labor Day is all about, and more – with a moving poem by Philip Levine.

 

When Michelle brings back a DMC Challenge, she brings it back with a bang – over at Today's Little Ditty  you'll find a glorious interview with Naomi Shihab Nye,  and poetry from her newest book,  VOICES IN THE AIR – Poems for Listeners.  (And the challenge.  You'll find that, too.)

 

More Monarch Love!  Of COURSE butterflies are adored at The Poem Farm. Amy shares Gloria's story today – Of COURSE butterflies have names at The Poem Farm. Enjoy her amazing photos and poem, as well as an upside-down look at process. (PS - Love right back to your spiders!)

 

Erin Mauger rings in from Australia with "Chicken Pox Rox" – an original poem which will have you recalling your own childhood bout of blisters – and also a compelling Tedx video of 13-year-old Poetry Slam champ Solli Raphael reciting "We Can Be More."

 

At My Juicy Little Universe, Heidi ponders teacherly pre-service duties vs. the actual art of teaching, and offers an oh-so-timely poem from 2012 by Janet Wong, "Declaration of Interdependence."

 

Irene has a bounty of Summer Poem Swap goodies over at Live Your Poem: treasures from Michelle Kogan, Karen Edmisten, Carol Varsalona, Molly Hogan,  and a revised poem she'd written to Tabatha – Swap Organizer Extraordinaire -  about the Swap!

 

I never tire of "Where I'm From" poems, the fruit of George Ella Lyons's poetry and work.  Kay McGriff shares her own today, and it is full of rich imagery that will "take you back" to your own childhood summer, if you were among the lucky to have one such as this.  

 

At Nix the Comfort Zone,  Molly Hogan shares stories and links about poetry and prison – literal and figurative prisons. Thoughtful ideas you'll want to explore.

 

Little Willow at bildungsroman finishes up a series of excerpts of poems by Indian-born Canadian poet Rupi Kaur.  Today's is from "A Light Like Mine."  

 

Join Carol Varsalona at Beyond Literacy Link  for a Summer Special Delivery, her last Poem Swap gift sharing.  Her imaginative treasures from Margaret Simon invite us to linger over summer one last time.  

 

Rebecca at Sloth Reads has final Summer Poem Swap offerings, too!  From sweet to spooky romps her post, with Linda Mitchell's delicious and delightful summertime poem and a spot of tea, to Carol Varsalona's fun and howling South Florida wilderness Buncee adventure. (Hint – makes my golden silk spider look like a miniature lamb.) 

 

From Friendly Fairy Tales, Brenda shares a fun short poem celebrating IMPERFECT – Poems About Mistakes.  Mistake-makers, unite! 

 

Ramona bids farewell to summer with a couple of Douglas Florian gems  - "Three Words" and "Pack Up" - at Pleasures from the Page.  Enjoy!

 

**Thanks to everyone for participating!  Calling it a day on my end; early plans Saturday morning and will be away from the computer.  Happy Long Weekending!**   And wait  - one more! End the roundup on a golden note with Catherine at Reading to the Core - https://readingtothecore.wordpress.com/2018/08/31/poetry-friday-a-glory-of-goldfinches/. Beautiful poem!

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Poetry Friday - This Title Is Longer than my Poem...

Greetings, Poetry Lovers!

 

There will be lots of words over here next week, when I host Poetry Friday.  

 

So this week I thought I 'd simply share the shortest poem I've ever had published - four words!  (You might recall my spring post about one-line haiku, sometimes called monoku.  Here's the link if you missed it.)

 

Today's poem appears in the summer issue of Modern Haiku.

 

 

 

a penny saved verdigris

 


Modern Haiku, Vol. 49.2, Summer 2018

 

 ©Robyn Hood Black

 

 

I had verdigris on my mind this spring, having recently turned in my batch of writing for the Core Essentials Character Education Curriculum I've been contributing to for many years.  I handle the animals, colors, and quotes corresponding to each monthly value.  Often I suggest/pick these items too, and this year I tossed in "verdigris."  I've always been enchanted by that variegated blue-green sheen over metal.  (And it wasn't hard to find a bit in my studio, either!)

 

Did you know it took the Statue of Liberty 30 years to change from her coppery brown to that beautiful green patina?  One must be patient with verdigris, and with poetry! Even the shortest poems appear when they want to, on their own time.

 

Thanks to our colorful, thoughtful Margaret for hosting the Roundup this week at Reflections on the Teche, where you can find links to poetry of varied lengths and learn about Zeno Zines! (See you back here next Friday.) :0)

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Poetry Friday - For the Birds this Week!

 

Greetings, Poetry Lovers - and Bird Lovers!

 

Our wonderful Round-up host today, Christie over at Wondering and Wondering, issued a call for bird poems for anyone so inclined.  Oh, I am ALWAYS inclined for birds.  I'm also a bit jealous about the educators workshop she participated in this summer with the Cornell bird folks in NY... Swoon!!!

 

We usually take our wee doggie Rita for a walk after dinner, sometimes around the neighborhood and sometimes on the Spanish Moss Trail at the end of our street.  I'm always craning my neck (ha - meant to do that?!) to see who's out and about among the tree canopy, power lines, or marshes as the sun sinks toward the horizon.

 

A few nights ago, thinking about the Poetry Friday bird-theme, I had a couple of treats on our walk.  

 

Here's the rather silly wordplay that sprouted from our sunset saunter:

 

 

Walking at Dusk, Tickled Pink

 

 

Woodpecker - pileated.

Spoonbills - roseate(d).

Birdwatcher me - très elated!

 

 

©Robyn Hood Black.  All rights reserved.

 

Those birds really ARE that pink, and they fish by swinging those curious bills horizontally back and forth along the surface of the water. 

 

Find out more here, and then click over for more about those equally magnificent pileated woodpeckers.

 

In case you missed my post last week, there are several birds in it!  I shared animal pictures from our Scotland/Ireland trip.  Over at my art blog, I shared a bunch more trip pictures of animals in art, images, and other related curiosities.  Check it out! :0)

 

Enjoy flocking over the the Roundup, and feathery thanks to Christie for the ornithological advenures in poetry!  And, not sure this will work, but here is a link to a video I posted on Facebook featuring those spoonbills. :0)

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Poetry Friday - Animals! TWO BY TWO, Trip Pictures, and New Books to Crow About...

 

 

Greetings, Poetry Lovers!

 

 

If you might indulge a few more trip pictures (with no promise that these are the last), I thought I'd share a brand new animal-themed book with a romping rhyme, and a general celebration of our non-human friends today. (Keep scrolling down after the post, if viewing on a computer, to see all of the animal pictures and the book cover at the bottom. IDs and locations are in the caption at the very bottom!)

 

 

Upon returning home from our amazing Scotland/Ireland family adventure this summer, I realized I had snapped several pictures of animals along with the castles and misty vistas.  Of course, I thought to myself upon this discovery.  My life has always been animal-centric, benefiting from a free-range childhood in the woods of Florida, and a lifetime of sharing life with the furred, feathered, hoofed, and scaled, and 30-plus years as a vegetarian. 

 

 

On our first full day in Edinburgh, a pigeon came to call at our apartment window overlooking James Court. We exchanged pleasantries.  I never thought conversing with birds was unusual, since I've done so since I was little, but my kids once gently let me know that not everyone goes around acting like Snow White in the forest scene in the original Disney movie. (Why not?)

 

 

This week I had a tête-à-tête with a broad-winged hawk (from a safe distance, yard to pine tree), letting it know that, No, I would not be putting my tiny Chihuahua back on the ground any time soon, thank you.

 

 

Anyway, as is my practice with close encounters of the animal variety, while in Scotland I looked up pigeon "spirit medicine" and found that it held perfect messages for the beginning of a trip that originated in vials sent off to Ancestry.com. 

 

 

"As a totem, the pigeon teaches us to return to our roots and explore our heritage. …  Pigeon also serves as a reminder that we come from a clan and are not alone."

https://www.thoughtco.com/bird-totems-4062050

 

 

Yay, pigeons!

 

 

And yay, books (especially ones with poetry!) which celebrate our fellow animals.

 

 

In 2011, it was my privilege to coordinate a children's poetry retreat with Rebecca Kai Dotlich for the SCBWI Southern Breeze region.  Among our wonderful attendees was long-time member Lisa Lowe Stauffer  Lisa's first book for children, TWO BY TWO, a board book by Zonderkids, has just been released! 

 

 

On her website, Lisa mentioned our SCBWI poetry retreat and an assignment Rebecca gave everyone.

 

 

"TWO BY TWO started as a simple, steady poem about Noah's Ark," she writes, noting that the first lines haven't changed.

 

 

On the first colorful page we find animals entering the ark:

 

 

Two by two,

 

Board the boat.

 

Shut the door.

 

Time to float.

 

 

The monkeys become bored, however, and soon they want to do much more than float.  In fact, they "free the zoo" so that all the animals can party like it's, well, a long long time ago, BC.

 

 

Illustrator Angelika Scudamore's bright and lively characters are appealing and full of expression.  Young readers/listeners will have fun pointing out all the different animals on each spread.  The trim size is a generous 8 X 8, perfect for sharing with a wee one in your lap.  Here is another taste of the fun verse:

 

 

Anaconda limbo,

 

Tigers race in pairs.

 

Ring toss on

 

the caribou,

 

Pin the tail on bears!

 

 

Did I mention this was a FUN book?  Congratulations, Lisa and Angelika!

 

 

Interestingly, another rhyming board book was born not too long after that poetry retreat.  Prolific children's author Gail Langer Karwoski penned THANK YOU, TREES (Kar-Ben Publishing, a division of Lerner) – a terrific book to share with any inhabitant of the planet. (Here's my blog post about it.) 

 

 

Other Poetry Friday regulars in attendance that weekend included Doraine Bennett and Irene Latham.  (Did I miss any other PF folks?)  Irene has written about LOTS of animals in her novels and picture books.  Keep an eye out for LOVE, AGNES: POSTCARDS FROM AN OCTOPUS (Millbrook) coming soon to a bookshelf near you!

 

 

One last shout-out. While in Edinburgh, I got to catch up with my buddy Elizabeth Dulemba, and Jane Yolen joined us for lunch.  (She and Elizabeth had a literary event together in Edinburgh that week.) Elizabeth blogged about our meet-up here.   She also blogged about TWO BY TWO with an interview with Lisa and Angelika here

 

 

Elizabeth has lent her rich artistic talents to a book written by Jane with her son, Adam Stemple.  This wonderful new book from Cornell Lab Publishing Group, CROW, NOT CROW, debuts  August 28. (Here is Jane's blog post about it, with peeks inside the pictures from Elizabeth here.)   

 

 

I can't wait to add it to my bookshelf, right next to our Amy Ludwig VanDerwater's EVERYDAY BIRDS.  Young and not-so-young readers who love birds will soon be crowing about CROW, NOT CROW! 

 

Now, flap on over to Nix the Comfort Zone, where the Magnificent Molly has our Roundup.  [What?  MORE trip pix, you ask?  Well, click on over to my new post at artsyletters for a bunch of "animals in images" (& other related curiosities) from our trip!]

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Poetry Friday - Wordplay over at Mary Lee's! (& my artsy newsletter info)

 

Quick Wave from the Front Lines of Summer!  Somehow Friday rolled back around before I was poetically ready.  Be sure to visit Mary Lee for the Roundup - and for a fun, blitzy poem. 

 

Since tomorrow is another wonderful "folk arrival day" at Chez Black, and since it's also First Friday downtown and my shop is, um, a disaster at the moment... I didn't get a post together.  But I did get an "enhanced" artsyletters newsletter out Thurs. eve. - a TRAVEL EDITION with pictures!  If you're intersted, shoot me an email and I'll forward it to you.  (You can sign up for future newsletters on the right side of the page here.) 

 

Happy Weekending!

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