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Life on the Deckle Edge

Poetry Friday - The Roundup is HERE!

 

Greetings, Poetry Lovers!

 

Many of you have just started a new school year, or are about to, or have watched your fledglings or grand-fledglings hop off to school or college. Such an exciting time!  (Our youngest fledgling has moved to Atlanta to start grad school/seminary this week.)

 

Seems like just yesterday he was turning the pages of BABYBUG, one of his favorite baby/toddler magazines.  In 2013, The HIGHLIGHTS FOR CHILDREN folks launched a magazine for the tiniest tykes:  HELLO – a "... chew-proof, drool-resistant magazine for babies and toddlers" that "packs up a bundle of joyful stories and poems, as well as expert advice for parents." It's a fun, educational adventure in print with thick, slick pages. (Here's a link to subscription information.) 

 

I've had a few poems accepted by HELLO and was thrilled to discover one had been published in the July issue.  I was even MORE thrilled when a Poetry Friday friend shared a picture of her grandson "reading" it! Isn't he adorable?  (Honored to share the picture, but we'll honor his privacy, too.)

 

Here's the poem:

 

    Spider, Spider

 

    by Robyn Hood Black

 

 

   Spider, spider,

   Weave and spin

   Down, around,

   And up again

 

   Spider, spider,

   Time to rest

   in your round

   And webby nest.

 

©2018 Highlights for Children

 

The poem was illustrated by Maria Neradova. (Click here for her website.)

 

[Spiderly aside… some of you might recall my obsession with Golden Silk Orb Weavers.  Two years ago at this time, I was following the daily habits of one which took up conveniently right outside my kitchen window.  I mentioned her in a couple of blog posts here and here.  The poem above came from my observations of her quick and fancy footwork building and rebuilding her web.]

 

This time of year does brim with excitement.  Just in case you've been on a month-long cruise with no cell service or WiFi, I want to make sure everyone knows about GREAT MORNING! Poems for School Leaders to Read Aloud.  This eye-opening volume features 75 poems by 50 poets and is the latest inspiring offering from Pomelo Books, the poetry-power publishing force led by Janet Wong and Sylvia Vardell.  (I'm delighted my poem, "Sincerely,"  is included, as a linked poem to Janet's "#1 and A++" which celebrates school volunteers.)

 

Lots of Poetry Friday blog posts have offered inside peeks – thanks to all who have shared.  Here's Sylvia's wonderful post over at Poetry for Children from July.  Click here for more at the Pomelo Books site.

 

So, GREAT MORNING to you… let's have a Roundup!  All are welcome, including you Thursday night early-birds/night owls. Leave your links in the comments below, and I'll round up old-school style throughout the day on Friday.  (Note – with recent changes in Blog-land privacy, I no longer have access to email addresses associated with comments.  Do remember to leave your link!) :0)

 

THE ROUNDUP:

 

Ruth at There is No Such Thing as a Godforsaken Town starts us off thoughtfully this week, in light of the darkness of the daily news. She shares an original sonnet in response, as well as one of The Bard's.

 

Kimberly Hutmacher raises a poetic toast with a sippy cup!  Read her perfectly wonderful original poem inspired by her granddaughter – and, if you can help out with Poetry Friday hosting on Oct. 19, let her know!

 

At Reflections on the Teche, the always-inspiring Margaret has a couple of wonderful student poems (shared by a fellow teacher) inspired by Margaret's new book, BAYOU SONG – Creative Explorations of the South Louisiana Landscape. Psstt… she'll be at the National Book Festival; will you?

 

At Radio, Rhythm & Rhyme, Matt has taken inspiration from Diane Mayr's cherita posts to pen a lovely back-to-school cherita of his own.  I dare you not to smile. 

 

Ever-clever librarian Linda at A Word Edgewise shares a peek into PLANET LIBRARY (a stroke of student brilliance) with a poem by Alberto Alvaro Ríos, "Don't Go into the Library."

 

Mary Lee at A Year of Reading has the perfect new-school-year poem for fellow teachers, as timely today as when she first shared it six years ago!

 

Michelle Kogan  guides us into this upcoming change of seasons with an original poem, "Running," and also "In Late August" by Peter Campion. AND, she's got info about her beautiful Etsy shop's participation in Etsy's Labor Day Sale this weekend.  (I'm in this weekend, too! :0) )  Michelle's shop-wide sale runs through Sept. 23rd.

 

Chiming in from the road this week, Jone Rush MacCulloch shares some Summer Poem Swap goodness from Linda Mitchell.  Fan of Monarch butterflies?  Carl Sandburg?  Collaged cards?  There's a lot of delight packed into a compact post!

 

Linda at TeacherDance has a special back-to-school poem she wrote for her grandkids (and everyone starting a new year), "School Starting – The Other To-Do List." I love it so much I sent it to my third-grade-teacher-daughter. (She loved it too!)

 

At The Opposite of Indifference, Tabatha offers us a personal look at history with Iris Jamahl Dunkle's haunting and lyrical "Communion of Dust." 

 

Diane has some fresh looks at death and poetry – yep – over at Random Noodling.  Enjoy her original work and you can learn a new phrase, too - "Momento Mori." 

 

Kurious Kitty reminds us what Labor Day is all about, and more – with a moving poem by Philip Levine.

 

When Michelle brings back a DMC Challenge, she brings it back with a bang – over at Today's Little Ditty  you'll find a glorious interview with Naomi Shihab Nye,  and poetry from her newest book,  VOICES IN THE AIR – Poems for Listeners.  (And the challenge.  You'll find that, too.)

 

More Monarch Love!  Of COURSE butterflies are adored at The Poem Farm. Amy shares Gloria's story today – Of COURSE butterflies have names at The Poem Farm. Enjoy her amazing photos and poem, as well as an upside-down look at process. (PS - Love right back to your spiders!)

 

Erin Mauger rings in from Australia with "Chicken Pox Rox" – an original poem which will have you recalling your own childhood bout of blisters – and also a compelling Tedx video of 13-year-old Poetry Slam champ Solli Raphael reciting "We Can Be More."

 

At My Juicy Little Universe, Heidi ponders teacherly pre-service duties vs. the actual art of teaching, and offers an oh-so-timely poem from 2012 by Janet Wong, "Declaration of Interdependence."

 

Irene has a bounty of Summer Poem Swap goodies over at Live Your Poem: treasures from Michelle Kogan, Karen Edmisten, Carol Varsalona, Molly Hogan,  and a revised poem she'd written to Tabatha – Swap Organizer Extraordinaire -  about the Swap!

 

I never tire of "Where I'm From" poems, the fruit of George Ella Lyons's poetry and work.  Kay McGriff shares her own today, and it is full of rich imagery that will "take you back" to your own childhood summer, if you were among the lucky to have one such as this.  

 

At Nix the Comfort Zone,  Molly Hogan shares stories and links about poetry and prison – literal and figurative prisons. Thoughtful ideas you'll want to explore.

 

Little Willow at bildungsroman finishes up a series of excerpts of poems by Indian-born Canadian poet Rupi Kaur.  Today's is from "A Light Like Mine."  

 

Join Carol Varsalona at Beyond Literacy Link  for a Summer Special Delivery, her last Poem Swap gift sharing.  Her imaginative treasures from Margaret Simon invite us to linger over summer one last time.  

 

Rebecca at Sloth Reads has final Summer Poem Swap offerings, too!  From sweet to spooky romps her post, with Linda Mitchell's delicious and delightful summertime poem and a spot of tea, to Carol Varsalona's fun and howling South Florida wilderness Buncee adventure. (Hint – makes my golden silk spider look like a miniature lamb.) 

 

From Friendly Fairy Tales, Brenda shares a fun short poem celebrating IMPERFECT – Poems About Mistakes.  Mistake-makers, unite! 

 

Ramona bids farewell to summer with a couple of Douglas Florian gems  - "Three Words" and "Pack Up" - at Pleasures from the Page.  Enjoy!

 

**Thanks to everyone for participating!  Calling it a day on my end; early plans Saturday morning and will be away from the computer.  Happy Long Weekending!**   And wait  - one more! End the roundup on a golden note with Catherine at Reading to the Core - https://readingtothecore.wordpress.com/2018/08/31/poetry-friday-a-glory-of-goldfinches/. Beautiful poem!

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Poetry Friday - A Couple of Haiku and some Purring


Greetings, Poetry Lovers - I've missed you!

The last couple-few weeks were a whirlwind of getting our recent college grad Seth home, re-tooled, and back out the door to a neighboring state for a year's internship with a lively broad-based urban ministry program. There's nothing quite like leaving your (grown-up) baby in the tough inner city. Folks there are amazing, and prayers for all of them and the folks they serve would be welcome.

This week I'll just share a couple of recently published haiku, and next week - Woo-hooo! - I'll offer a peek inside David G. Lanoue's hot-off-the-press newest book, Write Like Issa - A Haiku How-to. My contributor's copy just arrived in my mailbox and I can't wait to fully dive in.

For today, though here two other and unrelated poems - the first might remind us that as we approach the summer solstice, the wheel will turn toward fall again before we know it.


shorter days
the orb weaver gone
from her web



Modern Haiku, 48.1, Winter-Spring 2017


And the second features our above-pictured XL-sized kitty, sometimes slightly demon-possessed, 13 and still full of himself. "Lance" does love to join anyone doing yoga or meditation, though, so he has a sensitive side....


morning meditation
the cat in my lap
purrs in, purrs out



The Heron's Nest, Volume XIX, Number 2: June 2017

Poems ©Robyn Hood Black. All rights reserved.


Hope you are enjoying these long days if you're in the Northern Hemisphere, shorter ones if on the other side of the world.

Thanks to our wonderful Mary Lee for hosting the Roundup this week at A Year of Reading! Poetry in, poetry out... Read More 
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Poetry Friday: Daily Issa and Creatures Great and Small

I don’t know about you, but to counteract the weight of the daily news, I could use a daily dose of Issa!
[Kobayashi Issa (1763-1827) is regarded as one of the primary masters of haiku. He endured much hardship and loss, and his heartfelt poetry is known for its sensitivity to all living things.]

Wait -- Now I have a daily dose of Issa!

For years, Issa scholar and past-president of the Haiku Society of America David G. Lanoue has offered a random Issa poem delivered to your inbox or your Twitter account (or both!) . [Here’s a post about Dr. Lanoue (David) from my blog a couple-few years ago. A professor at Xavier University, he has translated upwards of 10,000 of Issa’s poems.]

His Issa website was launched in 2000. Click here to get to know Issa and sign up for daily poems. After my own unsuccessful attempt a while back to receive this daily treasure (operator error, I’m certain – it’s really quite easy), I finally got myself subscribed and love reading an Issa poem each day.

Thursday’s made me smile:


at an honest man's gate
honeybees
make their home


1824, translated by David G. Lanoue.


It reminded me of our summer guest I blogged about before – the golden silk orb weaver who took up just outside the back door and is still with us. She’s apparently going to go for a third brood?

Issa wrote about spiders, too. And lots of animals. Lanoue’s book, Issa and the Meaning of Animals – A Buddhist Poet’s Perspective (2014), offers accessible insights about this special poet and many of his haiku – a must if you are an Issa fan, a double-must if you are an animal-loving Issa fan.

Here’s one I love:


corner spider
rest easy, my soot-broom
is idle


Translated by David G. Lanoue.


And one more – this goes out to my newlywed teacher-daughter Morgan. They have seen deer a few times in their in-town neighborhood in Georgia this week; a buck, twice!


the young buck’s
antlers tilting…
“cuckoo!”


Translated by David G. Lanoue.


The book provides background and unlocks potential meanings for the poems, which give us beautiful imagery with or without explication. Hope you enjoyed this taste!

Are you a teacher? Click here and here for David’s website pages designed just for you. You can “test” your haiku/Issa knowledge with the first link, and find out about how to share Issa’s life and poetry with kids at the second.

Also, if picture poetry books call your name, you might enjoy sharing Matthew Gollub’s Cool Melons – Turn to Frogs! – The Life and Poems of Issa, illustrated by Kazuko G. Stone (Lee & Low, 1998, 2004). This colorful paperback combines some biography and sample poems to offer glimpses into Issa’s life and writing.

That's what’s going on in my universe this week. For the Poetry Friday Roundup and lots more poetic goodness, please visit poet and teacher extraordinaire Heidi over at My Juicy Little Universe.  Read More 

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